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Our “Must Do” Outdoor Activities in Southern Utah

If you are looking towards Southern Utah for your next family vacation, we have some favorite spots we think you should check out. Most of our staff lives in St George and have become well versed in the many attractions and activities around here. Our top “to-do’s” are listed below, let us know if you have any other favorites that should have made the list.

Lava Tubes at Snow Canyon State Park

The lava tubes in Snow Canyon State Park and the perfect adventure for family fun. There are 3 main tubes that you can explore and a few others that require some tights squeezing to enter. Inside you can find geological wonders and cooler temperatures. Some of the paths require a little bit of climbing so we suggest bringing a headlamp and backpack if you really want to explore. This excursion can take as little as 30 minutes or as long as 2 days if you explore in depth.

Zion National Park

If you are in the area and have the time, we highly recommend spending some time in Zion’s National Park. Zion offers great hiking and camping for all ages and experience levels. For the beginner we suggest the riverside walk, for the adventurer we suggest spending a day hiking the Angel’s landing trail. For a full list of our favorite hikes in Zion click here.

Kanaraville Falls

Kanaraville Falls is a beautiful hike that takes you on an adventure through a slot canyon with extraordinary views and a chance to climb up a waterfall! This hike is growing in popularity, but doesn’t have the same crowds that you will find in some of the larger national parks. This 4.8 mile hike is great for most ages, but keep in mind there are some trickier parts that might not be a great fit for young inexperienced hikers. Bring shoes you can get wet, some sunscreen, a camera, and an adventurous spirit to make this hike a memorable experience.

Hoodoos in Bryce Canyon

Hoodoos rock structures that resemble a totem-pole. These large structures are formed through erosion of land overtime, and range from 5 to 150 feet tall. One of the most common places to find these glorious formations is right next door in Bryce Canyon National Park. The variety in the rocks makes for a fun learning experience for children and geological enthusiasts alike! To learn more about these exciting formations check out this article on Bryce Canyon Geology.

Outdoor shows at Tuacahn

Tuacahn is a world famous outdoor amphitheater just a short 18-minute drive from St George, UT. The theater boasts visits from world famous performers and frequent Broadway shows. Their family-friendly season make this theater a must for any family vacation. Experience some of your Broadway favorites like you never have before with advanced technical design and the unique backdrop of Southern Utah red rock. For more information and a list of events visit their website  here.

ATV Adventure

Our final “must” for the St George area is taking an ATV adventure tour with our staff. A great tour for any level of experience would be our three-hour sandstone teaser. This adventure is perfect for individuals who don’t have a ton of time, or just want to try out an ATV ride. You will explore the beautiful Sand Hollow Park visiting geological sites and experience breathtaking views all guided by our skilled staff. This adventure covers 14-18 miles of unrepeated terrain. Climb red rock and glide over sand dunes in this thrilling adventure. To book this adventure click here.

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Two Dinosaur Sites in Southern Utah Your Family Will Love

Southern Utah is home to some brilliant desert scenery. While certainly beautiful, it can be difficult to imagine the landscapes as anything but the sun-drenched hills and valleys, dotted with dry brush and framed by red sandstone cliffs. However, millions of years ago, this land was very different. For example, in the late cretaceous period (somewhere around 75 million years ago), half of Utah was under water, while the other half was part of the island continent of Laramidia, the western portion of what would eventually be North America.

Before that, during the early Jurassic period 200 million years ago, Southern Utah consisted of a floodplain 2, where lakes, streams, and mudflats would form and evaporate on a seasonal basis. These waterways were frequented by dinosaurs, who left behind evidence of their existence in the form of tracks made in the soft mud and river sediments. Many of these tracks were preserved after the water all dried up, and can be seen today in a number of track discovery sites around St. George, UT.

Here are two of the best places to see them for yourself:

Warner Valley Dinosaur Track Site

In 1982, a site containing dinosaur footprints was discovered by Gary Delsignore while he was exploring Warner Valley. Upon initial examination, the site was thought to have around 160 tracks. However, it was reevaluated in 2010, when paleontologists discovered the site actually contains over 400 tracks, and 23 trackways (which are a series of tracks left by the same animal) 3.

While they cannot know the exact species of dinosaur just from footprint alone, paleontologists use the sizes and shapes of the tracks to tie them to groups of dinosaurs who may have made them. The tracks at Warner Valley fall into two types called Grallator and Eubrontes, and paleontologists have theorized what specific dinosaurs may have made them.

All of this information and more can be found on panels at the site, which is accessed by a short hiking trail near Hurricane, UT. The site is free to visit, and most of the tracks are congregated in one area indicated by signs. The trail is under a half mile round-trip, very easy to navigate, and consists of a short, steep hill before reaching the site itself. It’s a great hike to bring your kids, who will love the sense of exploration and discovery as you come right up to the tracks themselves.

Dinosaur Discovery Site at Johnson Farm

What better way to escape the summer heat than a dinosaur museum? The Dinosaur Discovery Site at Johnson Farm is located in St. George, UT, and contains a multitude of well-preserved tracks and other fossils. It was discovered in 2000 when Dr. Sheldon Johnson was leveling a hill on his land, and found tracks preserved between the layers of sandstone. He and his wife worked to protect the location, and eventually donated the tracks and land to the city of St. George.

The museum was built on top of the site. While a bit on the small side, it hosts thousands of tracks and is full to the brim with fun and educational things to see and do. It includes a preparation lab where trained volunteer’s clean fossil samples, and a classroom with rotating exhibits and activities.

Viewing of the tracks themselves begins with a short video about the site and what’s to be found there. After that, visitors are free to stroll around a boardwalk built over the original track surface. There are several plaques along the path to explain what to look for and where (some of the tracks can be hard to spot without the helpful guides). Besides the footprints, there are also marks identified as tail dragging, swimming tracks, and even prints from dinosaurs sitting or lying down.

Towards the end of the boardwalk path there are many other fossil types and replicas to view and learn about, and there are some beautiful murals throughout the facility. The museum is staffed by friendly volunteers who are happy to share their knowledge about the site and the species that lived there long ago. All in all, this museum is a fun and intriguing peek into what life may have been like when dinosaurs roamed the land.

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  1. & 2. Information taken from panels at the Warner Valley Dinosaur Tracks Site
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Six great local parks & museums for children in Southern Utah

 

 

Southern Utah is known for Zion and Bryce National parks but there is so much more to do and see, especially with children. The area is filled with wonderful neighborhood parks, tons of history and historical areas, several State Parks and even ghost towns. It seems like there is a park, playground or pond in almost every area of the Southern Utah. Washington County actually wants to have a park or pond accessible to every residential area that is within walking distance and they are doing a good job of providing that. Here are just a couple of our favorite parks/playgrounds for the kids.

Downtown St. George City….

Dixie Rock at Pioneer Park

Every visit to Southern Utah should include a visit to Pioneer Park (a.k.a. Dixie Rock). This is actually a city park that encompasses 52 acres of incredible hiking, rock climbing, slot canyons and caves. There area areas to have an afternoon picnic, BBQ or just to take a well-deserved rest scattered throughout the park. From the top of the Dixie Rock you can see the entire St. George valley, White Dome, Zion National Park and Arizona. While you are there don’t forget to hike up to Scouts Cave and try to go through the “slot canyon”. Both very popular places in the park.

Red Hills Desert Garden

Right next to the Dixie Rock is one of the newest parks in Southern Utah is Red Hills Desert Garden. This is the first desert conservation garden the state of Utah. The park includes a man-made stream with water pumped directly from the Virgin River with 6 native fish species as well as over 170 species of drought tolerant plants. There is a replica of a slot canyon that towers well over 7 feet in the air. While walking around in the slot canyon you will find a fantastic area where there are acrylic windows placed in the faux rock. These windows allow you to get a peak at the aquatic life living in the river. Parts of the river are made to be crossed because you will find huge rock stepping stones to navigate over to get to the other side. There is plenty of seating scattered throughout the park as well.

Town Square and Carousel

Just south of the Dixie Rock is the Town Square with a splash pad, lazy river, a vintage carousel and the Children’s Museum. This is a truly wonderful town square and park. The main attraction is the lazy river and the splash pad. The man-made river meanders through out the greater portion of the park. There is a rock waterfall on the north end of the river that flows into very shallow water where the kids can bet their feet wet but still be safe. There are also large sitting rocks in the middle of the river to relax on. You can’t miss the splash pad for great summer fun. This is the largest splash pad in Southern Utah and is usually filled with kids cooling off. To the west side of the park is the Vintage Carousel where people of all ages can go for a spin on their favorite horse or in a carriage seat. There is ample seating, shade and picnic areas, bathrooms and huge grass areas throughout the Town Square as well.

The Children’s Museum

Just next door to the town square is the Children’s Museum. The museum is fairly new and a favorite in the community. It is free for all children to enter and explore. The museum encompasses 3 floors and 10,000 square feet. Your children will be able to explore everything from prehistoric animals, milking “cows”, pretending to be a knight in a castle, a mechanic working on cars and so much more. They have a sports room, science, music, art and theater exhibits as well as an airport where every child can be the pilot! The Children’s Museum also has special exhibits throughout the year and is a favorite place for most of the local children to be free and creative.

Thunder Junction Park

The newest park on the south west side of St. George is Thunder Junction. Thunder Junction is the only all abilities park created for children in Southern Utah. Thunder Junction features a volcano pavilion for parties, lunch, etc. If you use the BBQ grill, then the volcano actually starts smoking to simulate an eruption! This prehistoric themed city park has everything from splash pads to water features to a vast amount of playground equipment. Everything in the park has been made so that a handicapped child can still have just as much fun as anyone else. There are handicapped accessible ziplines, swings, water features as well as a train ride that circles the park and crosses the park to give everyone a fun scenic tour of the park. There is a massive dinosaur with a double slide built in the tail and a Tyrannosaurus Rex skull that sprays water out of its mouth. Thunder Junction is truly a unique park for everyone of all ages.

Rosenbruch Wildlife Museum

The Rosenbruch Wildlife Museum occupies more than 35,000 sq. feet where visitors can see over 300 different species of animals found throughout the world all displayed in their natural habitat. Different parts of the world make up the displays. There is the mountains of Asia, the plains of Africa and the forests of North America. One of the main highlight of the museum is the 2-story mountain. The mountain has waterfalls and speakers that give the sounds of the animals and even a periodic thunder and lightening storm can be heard. You will see preserved animals such as mountain lions, elk, moose, deer, bighorn sheep, buffalo, crocodiles, giraffes and even a snarling cheetah as well as a vast variety of birds. There are also 100’s of insects and a wonderful butterfly collection. There is also a large kid’s room that has a full-size tree house, reading nooks, climbing area, a camping play area and a large variety of animal pelts, fur and horns that the children can touch and explore. Just outside of the museum is one of the best information and gift shops in the area.

The National parks are a must see but don’t forget about visiting the local parks as well.

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Dickens Festival

Christmastime is a time full of tradition and wonder. Many families celebrate with food, music, gift-giving and other traditional activities that have been passed down from generation to generation. It is a time when people both young and old get together and share in the joyful sense of Christmas spirit. All these elements, and more, are reflected in the St. George Dickens’ Festival every winter.

It began in 2001 by some of the same people who founded the Dickens’ Festival in Salt Lake City. By now, the festival has been an ongoing tradition for over 30 years, and when you attend one yourself you can easily see why. Recreating the 19th century London of Charles Dickens’ stories, the festival is engulfed in an atmosphere that evokes the Christmas spirit in such a natural, yet thrilling way. Booths fill the Dixie Convention Center, arranged in narrow, winding paths to resemble crowded London streets. Vendors who run the booths are required to adhere to strict codes, to uphold the festival’s themes. The booths are all decorated to resemble Olde English shops, and those working inside them are dressed in period-appropriate costumes and speak in their best British accents.

Entertainment abounds at the festival, where music and laughter fill the air. A variety of performances can be viewed from two stages in the convention hall. Mini productions of Scrooge and Oliver play every night, as well as performances by local dance and music groups. There is also a number of actors in costume performing “street theater” as characters inspired by Dickens’ work, including orphans, pickpockets, Queen Victoria, Fagin, and Scrooge himself. Father Christmas is there all day each day, ready with a smile to hear your Christmas wishes. The same man has played the part for over 30 years, and his skill in the role is a big draw to the festival for many families. Beyond a visit with Father Christmas, there are a number of other activities to delight the children, including brass rubbing, candle dipping, costume dress-up, and one year there were even live reindeer to see.

Food is available through catering by the convention center, and a number of booths also sell sweet treats and delectable goodies. The smells coming from Mr. Bumble’s Buns are irresistible, thanks to the variety of cinnamon rolls offered there. Other treats commonly found include fudges, pastries, popcorn, and Pioneer Valley’s excellent selection of jams and syrups.

The booths provide a fun and thrilling shopping experience. Many of them contain handmade artisan items, such as beautiful soaps, hand-carved wooden objects, knitted or crocheted toys and clothing, and much much more. It’s a great place to find unique Christmas gifts for friends and family, and the variety of shops makes it easy to get something for everyone.

Held in the last week of November, in the Dixie Convention Center, the Dickens’ Festival is a wondrous experience. The music, entertainment, food, shopping, decorations, all set against the backdrop of 19th Century London, combine to form an atmosphere that is certain to appeal to your sense of Christmas Spirit. Make a visit to the festival this year, and it will surely become a new tradition for your family to share for years to come.

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Educational Activities in St George

If you are looking for a way to put some education in your next family vacation to St George, we have a few spots that are sure to be a crowd pleaser. St George is full of historical locations, geological sites, and educational museums. Listed below are some of our favorite kid-friendly educational activities to enjoy during your next visit to St George.

Historical walking tour of St George

Taking a self-guided walking tour of the Downtown area in St George is an excellent way to learn about the towns rich history. This is the perfect educational activity for the family and includes many locations where experienced tour guides can give you in depth descriptions of each building. The Chamber of Commerce in St George also provides a detailed description of each location on their printable tour map which can be found here.

Rosenbruch Wildlife Museum

The Rosenbruch Wildlife Museum is home to a vast display of animals from all over the globe. This museum is a great educational outing for any age. They have electronically guided tours, so you are able to move at your own pace. Their dedicated space for young children will engage your youth in educational hands-on activities that will make for truly memorable experiences. This museum is a non-profit and contributes to the preservation of wildlife.

Red Hills Desert Garden

If you have been to St George you have probably heard of the “Dixie Rock”, but a newer attraction recently to make its appearance just East of the famous stone is the Red Hills Desert Garden. This garden features a wide variety of desert plants and live native fish that can be viewed through plexiglass windows in their man-made slot canyon. You can experience the whole garden in less than an hour, but we suggest taking your time learning about the many exhibits there. Be sure to watch the ground, as historic tracks are nestled in the rock between the displays! For more information visit their website here.

Western Sky Aviation Warbird Museum

The western sky aviation warbird museum is a non-profit aviation museum dedicated to preserving, restoring, and displaying aircraft. Many of the planes were used in World War II or the Korean War. Most of the staff at the museum are experienced aviation experts and are happy to answer any questions you have. Many of the aircrafts are still flown today on special occasion so be sure to check with staff if there are any special events during your stay where you can see these warbirds take flight. The museum also features visiting aircrafts, so each visit could be entirely different. There is not entrance fee to the museum, but a $2 donation is suggested.

Dino Cliffs Dinosaur Tracks

The Dino Cliffs Dinosaur Tracks is a .5-mile family-friendly hike that rewards hikers with a stunning view of ancient dinosaur tracks rumored to be from the Jurassic period. This excursion is a short 15-minute drive from St George and allows for the whole family (including pets) to scramble around stunning red rock formations. Be sure to bring sunscreen as much of this hike is in direct sun.

ATV Off-Road Van Tour

This list wouldn’t be complete without including our amazing Southern Utah van excursions. These tours are extremely affordable and educational. On tour you will see petroglyphs, a gypsum mine, the historical remains of Fort Pearce, and real fossilized dinosaur tracks. The best part about visiting these locations on a tour, is you have an experienced guide who can share history and details you may have missed visiting these locations on your own. For more information on our van tours click here.

 

Our Favorite St George Restaurants

The stunning red rock landscape of St George, UT is where many of our staff call home. We love sharing our tips and tricks to anyone visiting the area. Whether they are passing through on their way to one of the many national parks in our area, or spending some time enjoying the many historic and geological sites right here in St George. One question our visitors frequently inquire about, is what local restaurants are our favorites. We all have different favorites, so be sure to ask your guide, but we wanted to share our top five restaurant choices here with you today!

Cappelettis

Cappelettis is an Italian bistro owned and operated by locals Andres & Lorena Cappeletti. Their menu was crafted from family recipes with rich Italian roots and an Argentine flare. The venue is warm and inviting, with a constant buzz of conversation. This restaurant is perfect for an evening date night. A couple of our favorite menu items are the Chicken Marsala, or the Gnocchi Bolognese. Desert selection varies by day, but if you get the chance we highly recommend the flourless chocolate cake. Wine selection is excellent, and the staff is attentive and helpful. Be sure to call in advance for a table, as they are often full in the evening hours. To view their full dinner menu click here.

Georges Corner

George’s Corner is a lively restaurant & pub that offers live music and historic artifacts of the St George area. The restaurant itself was once the primary gathering spot for locals to share news and escape the St George heat. This pub is the perfect spot to grab a burger with a side of sweet potato fries and discuss your adventures from the day. There is a full bar with special local brews. To view the full menu click here.

Bishops Grill

Bishops grill is a no-frills diner with delicious and hearty homestyle meals. Their very reasonable prices and all-day breakfast are what bring most families into this little small-town diner. This is the perfect place to bring your kids for an afternoon breakfast-for-dinner. We recommend the biscuits and gravy.

Bear Paw Café

The Bear Paw Café is a quant coffee shop known for it’s tasty breakfast and brunch. This café is an exceptional place for a family brunch. Their carefully crafted coffee’s and steamers and the perfect way to start your day. They have a wide selection of Belgian waffles and omelets that will sustain you through all your daily adventures. We highly recommend the French toast, it is a staff favorite. For more details on this little café click here.

Paula’s Cazuela

This original Tex-mex restaurant is perfect for your Mexican cuisine cravings. The owner, Paula, started cooking her Spanish-Native American hybrid’s for friends and family when she first came to St George. After word spread she started catering and eventually opened up her own restaurant. The restaurant has moved three times to accommodate high demand and is known as a local favorite. Paula’s Cazuela is nestled into the red rock near the “D” for Dixie. Be sure to try the homemade guacamole and Mexican Ice Cream. For full menu click here.

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Camping in Zion National Park

Exploring Zion National Park is something every out-door enthusiast should put on their bucket list, but we think if you really want to have the full experience you should go camping at one of the many locations the park and surrounding areas offer. Whether you are an avid mountaineer, RV traveler, or strictly into Glamping, Zion has a spot for you. Here is a list of our favorite spots when we are exploring the park.

In The Park:

Did you become an eagle scout at age 13? Maybe you backpacked through Europe in college spending more than one night underneath the stars. If you are experienced and enjoy “roughing it” you will love camping in Zion. The park has three official camp sites inside the park, South Campground, Watchman Campground, and The Lava Point. There are several campgrounds only a short drive from the park if these sites don’t work for your family.Zion National Park Camping

  • South Campground:
    South Campground is located ½ mile from the South entrance of the park. Campsites cost about $20 and range upwards if it is a large group site.  There are over 100 campsites (including a few wheelchair accessible) but they are only available on a first -come first- serve basis. Campsites fill up during the early hours of the day and it has been noted that campers will start coming to claim spots as early as 5:30AM. There are no RV hookups available at this location, so this spot is primarily for tent camping.
  • Watchman Campground:
    Watchman Campground is located only a short ¼ mile from the South entrance of the park. A great feature of this campground is you are able to reserve a spot in advance online. This site is primarily occupied by reservations from March to November, but with it’s 176 campsites it has been known to accommodate a few last minute travelers.  This ground does provide RV hookups but there is limited access so be sure to book early. Campsites here range from $20-$130 depending on how many tent spots you need and if you need electric hookups.
  • Lava Point Campground:
    The Lava Point Campground is about an hour and twenty minutes from the South entrance of the park and only provides six primitive campsites. These grounds are easier for tent camping but people have been known to take their RV as well. Lava point provides pit toilets but no running water. This is a first-come, first-serve, basis campground but provides a truly spectacular experience of camping in Zion. There is no fee for this campground and it is well secluded from any other campground providing a quite evening in nature.

Outside the Park:

If you are making your first trip to Zion, it may be easier to find a campsite outside the park. There are also several grounds that include running water, showers, and convenient RV hookups just outside the park gates.

Camping RV

  • Zion Canyon Campground and RV Resort:
    This campground is located just outside the South entrance gates in Springdale, Utah within walking distance to the official Zion National Park visitor center. It is just next door to the Quality Inn (which is under the same management) this means campers can enjoy laundry facilities, pools, and showers. There is specified areas of the campground just for tent campers and spacious areas to park your RV.
  • Zion River Resort RV Park and Campground:
    Zion River Resort is really popular for RV’s it is about a 20 minute drive from the Park but provides luxurious amenities such as paved parking, fire pits, well maintained landscape and even WIFI! If you don’t want to drive yourself to Zion the site offers shuttles to the park for a nominal fee. This is a great spot for families who aren’t experienced campers.
  • BLM Campgrounds:
    The Bureau of land management also offers several campgrounds in the Southern Utah area. BLM land can range from manicured campgrounds to back country deserts, where the only noise you will hear is from the wildlife. Most sites on BLM land are free to stay at, or only charge a very small fee for the night. Click Here to see what areas they currently have available.

With any campground you stay at, please be responsible and make sure to clean up for the next person. Check campground rules to determine the best way to handle waste management, and be sure to check for fire restrictions before you camp.

We hope you enjoy your time camping and have an even better time exploring the park. While you are in the area be sure to come ride with us and we will show you some reasons why we believe this corner of the world is worth your time.

Have a favorite place to camp in the area? Drop us a message in the comments!

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Zion National Park Climbing Routes

Zion National Park is an excellent place to expand your adventuring repertoire, and a location that many people place on their bucket list for its unique offerings. One particularly adventurous attraction, is the vast and extraordinary climbing routes scattered throughout and around the canyon. In an effort to provide you with an insider look, we asked professional climber and geology expert Fallon Rowe about climbing in Zion and what she recommends for the novice climber all the way to expert.

Beginning Climbers

Even if you have never been in a climbing harness, there is still a place for you in Zion National Park. While Zion is known for its many trad climbs and multi-pitch ascents there are many beautiful spots to try your hand at bouldering or regular sport climbing. If you have never climbed before we suggest taking a guided climbing tour, there are several businesses surrounding the canyon that provide all the expertise and gear that you need to get close and personal with the grand rock formations the canyon provides. Fallon recommends checking out Cerberus Gendarme, this climbing location provides several routes of all levels that will fit anyone’s sport climbing needs.

Zion National Park climbing Fallon Rowe

Fallon on Headache -PC: Fallon Rowe

Advanced Climbers

If you are an experienced climber and are looking for a longer climb Fallon recommends the three following routes:

The Headache This climb is a 5/10 trad climb with 3 pitches. This route is well protected with breath taking views. (pictured below)

Monkey Finger – This climb is a 5/12 big-wall trad climb that is for experienced climbers only. This 9-pitch route has a lot of variety in the climbing so if you only have one day out of your trip to get climbing in, this is an excellent route to try.

Moonlight Buttress – Considered by some to be one of the best trad climbing routes in the world, moonlight buttress is an experienced climbers dream. This is a 10-pitch route that will take all day to complete. Plan to bring lots of water and know that you may need to aid climb on areas of this route.

Zion National Park climbing Fallon Rowe 2

Fallon Gearing Up – PC: Fallon Rowe

Gear to bring

If you are trying out climbing for the first time we recommend going with a guided tour company who can help provide you with the climbing gear you need, but you will still want to pack good hiking shoes, sunscreen, water, a flashlight, and a jacket. The basic climbing gear such as, helmet, harness, shoes, chalk, belay device, and rope are essential to any climb. When going bouldering, it is important that you always wear a helmet and we highly recommend using bouldering crash pads to prevent injury. When climbing a more advanced route you will need to bring at least a double rack of cams and nuts, tape, and be sure to bring extra containers for water. Fallon also recommends bringing a GPS device, as some routes are off trail and the canyon can get difficult to navigate if you end up descending in the dark.

Zion National Park Climbing Fallon Rowe 3

Sqeeze and Play – PC: Fallon Rowe

When to go

Zion National Park can get hot in the summer, so if you plan to incorporate climbing into your trip we suggest going in the early spring (March & April) or fall (October & November). If you decide to go during these times it is essential that you watch the weather reports for rain. Zion provides the unique experience of climbing on sandstone, however, sandstone becomes very brittle and dangerous when wet so be sure to wait at least 2 days after every rain storm before climbing to allow the rock to dry out. If your trip happens to get rained out, there are several climbs on granite in the surrounding areas of the park.

Snacks to pack

When going on a climbing trip it is important to pack light snacks that you can carry with you. You don’t want to eat anything too heavy as it can make it difficult to continue climbing and make your experience less enjoyable. Fallon recommended bringing light packaged items like fruit snacks, granola bars, or trail mix as well as a few items to sustain you in case the climb takes longer than anticipated like protein bars and jerky.

Transportation

Zion National Park provides a shuttle bus throughout their season, so be sure to study the schedule before you plan a climb or hike. The shuttle system shuts down typically around 8 p.m. so be sure to plan plenty of time to get to your bus stop before the end of the night. During the off season for the park, you can drive your personal vehicle to any of the shuttle stops.

Be sure to let us know if you have any favorite climbs or advice for climbing in Zion National Park!